ALICE ECHOLS HOT STUFF PDF

Alice Echols, a professor of American studies and history at Rutgers But in her engrossing new book, “Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of. Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture by Alice Echols. Tim Lawrence. University of East London. Search for more papers by. Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture by Alice Echols. Richard D. Driver. Texas Tech University. Search for more papers by.

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Selected pages Page 2. Ships from and sold by Amazon. Trivia About Hot Stuff: Not perfect by any means but a really good discussion of the s, disco, and American culture.

Even my beloved punk fell into that cycle see also, Green Day. Preview — Hot Stuff by Alice Echols. It is, after all, a non-fiction book and not a bit of fluff in People magazine. Read reviews that mention hot stuff alice echols echols new book book on disco culture american women cultural gay important informative movements social. This would have gotten three stars from me just for mentioning The Electrifying Mojo and the Nectarine Ballroom, but in addition, it was a good work of cultural history.

Open Preview See a Problem? Disco thumps back to life in this pulsating look at the culture and politics that gave rise to the music. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. New York’s Underground, Week by Week. I learned that the famous “Disco Break” the break in the music before you whip the dance crowd back into a frenzy comes from gospel music.

You won’t say “disco sucks” as disco thumps back to life in this pulsating look at the culture and politics that gave rise to the music. And that, in retrospect, no one seems to have actually payed attention to what the plot of Saturday Night Fever was about. Moreover, she convincingly places disco in the context of broader social and political history.

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To view it, click here. Most people tend to recoil at either hearing or reading the word “disco” but this book takes the subject and studf into a very interesting sociological context.

Echols argues through the well-known images of disco that the genre and its culture reshaped American life by empowering various groups In the thirty years since it supposedly died, disco music and its culture have remained fodder for anecdotes about a forgettable decade in U. Customers who bought this item also bought.

The book inspired me to seek out music I’d never listened to aalice such as the Philly soul of the early 70s that created a template for the disco sound. Disco does NOT suck.

Hot Stuff | W. W. Norton & Company

But it does put Disco into historical perspective and explains how it empowered marginalized groups and brought them into the mainstream. By the mid seventies a sizeable number of onetime liberals, dubbed neoconservatives, were joining together with longtime conservatives to mobilize “Middle America” against abortion rights, affirmative action, school busing, sex education, the Equal Rights Amendment, welfare, and “criminal coddling” civil liberties.

Start reading Hot Stuff: Easy to read, informative and, if you know anything about disco, a pretty good beginning to a great playlist for a road trip. At first he though they were designed for particularly athletic sex, but then it dawned on him: In short, my love of Disco has been validated!

As someone who lived through the era, but was a clueless teenager at the time, this was eye-opening and engrossing. Disco and the Remaking of American Culture on your Kindle in under a minute. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway. What does that mean in a broader social context?

Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture

Echols focuses on a variety ecbols groups to emphasize how racial, sexual, and class intersections in the s played out through the expansion of disco music and clubs and argues disco acted as a form of pop music that offered greater social opportunities within American culture. Disco thumps back to life in this pulsating exploration of the culture and politics of the glitterball world.

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I found myself looking up different artists on youtube, and I recommend reading this book with a computer nearby. In the thirty years since it supposedly died, disco music and its culture have remained fodder for anecdotes about a forgettable decade in U.

If you also want nuanced discussion that places disco in its own sociocultural milieu and offers detailed analysis of its impact both past and future and of what the rise and fall to ri This was good, but not as good as I expected it to be. What it meant socially to different groups, how it changed US culture and values, the lifestyles behind the music, and best of all, the music itself.

I was never into the s disco scene and didn’t really know too much about it or how huge it really was socially or The book is fascinating, carried along by prose that is as sleek and slinky as its subject.

Jun 02, Sheehan rated it really liked it. Also, when talking about the influence of disco on current popular music, I wasn’t really convinced: Oh, I really, really liked this. With characteristic stylistic verve and scholarly acumen, Echols trolls the edges of our culture’s underbelly to discern its central place in politics and economics. Account Options Sign in. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Alice Echols’s book on disco’s part in the 70s cultural revolution is fantastic.

Aug 15, John rated it really liked it. Apr 07, Andie Nash rated it liked it. Guess I prefer the part of the musical sequence that turns from producer-driven music to music driven by artists.

I’d like to know more about how and why disco went from being a “subversive, politically incendiary” music to a “safe” and “silly” object of nostalgia which Echols hints at in the closing chapter. Echols may overreach in some of her analysis, but I thought most of her

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